Why a Hub & Spoke Wellness Model Fails

Why a Hub & Spoke Wellness Model Fails

What if you could DOUBLE the impact of your wellness program at HALF the cost? According to research, less than 7% of U.S. companies use the wellness program components and models that are necessary to get the most effective outcomes (Goetzel & Ozminkowski, 2008).
In this post, we show you the most common U.S. wellness model, and explain why it fails. If you oversee a wellness program or vendors, then you need to read this post - and stop wasting your money on approaches that don't work. Of course, if you want a model to improve your outcomes, then feel free to give us a call. 

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Properly positioning the value of health

Properly positioning the value of health

With "wellness ROI" under increasing scrutiny, now is the perfect time to reposition the value of health as an organizational strategy and not simply a tactic for risk reduction and cost containment. But before you change your value proposition, you need to ensure your program will actually achieve organizational benefits. Read here to learn of 4 signs your current strategy may need to change... 

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Start with the End in Mind

Start with the End in Mind

I love tennis and I love the U.S. Open. Like learning new healthy behaviors, learning tennis is a skill, and it won't happen overnight. So why do so many companies focus on the short term wins of isolated wellness campaigns? Successful strategies which will actually gain, and sustain the engagement of your population towards meaningful health changes need to be more strategic and built with the end in mind...

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Say "NO WAY" to Plug and Play.

Say "NO WAY" to Plug and Play.

"Plug and Play" wellness initiatives serve vendors, not employers. The more generic and automated a company can make it's wellness program, the more scalable it is and the less man-power it requires. That makes it more profitable per user, however it sacrifices the specificity or personal attention needed for people at early stages of behavioral readiness.

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How to Build a Better Wellness Program in 2015

How to Build a Better Wellness Program in 2015

Here are 3 tips on how you can shift your perspective when building your wellness strategy in order to create a more successful program. One of the biggest issues we find with many company wellness programs is that there are too many pieces that don't have purpose. Don't simply provide a bunch of activities, think about how you can put programs together that will generate more meaningful engagement from your population. 

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Good to Great: The difference is the strategy

Good to Great: The difference is the strategy

The number of activities or vendors on your wellness calendar isn't a measure of how comprehensive your program is. Comprehensive programs are those with the most cohesive strategy and greatest integration with your work flow. A better strategy can take a wellness program from good to great. Reflect on the strength of your strategy with these four critical questions. 

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Effectively Change Culture and Behaviors

Effectively Change Culture and Behaviors

Averaging over 80% total population voluntary, monthly program engagement, means we know a thing or two about wellness strategy. While most wellness strategies miss the mark in terms of engaging employees to a degree that will influence cultural and behavioral change - your program doesn't need to be one of them. Here are 3 tips to help you improve the effectiveness of your program.

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Are Wellness Incentives Worth the Money?

Are Wellness Incentives Worth the Money?

Does your wellness strategy include incentives? Chances are it does, as estimates suggest that more than two thirds of U.S. employers are spending an average of three-quarters of their annual wellness budget on incentives. But for what? Science would suggest that incentives may actually reduce the effectiveness of programs on long term behavior change. Is it time you put your money towards a higher value investment? 

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Monday Motivation: Define Your Purpose

Monday Motivation: Define Your Purpose

Does your health promotion program have purpose? If so, is that purpose a business objective, or is it to enhance the lives of your employees? You might say "both," and for many, a belief in that is true. To test if your hope that your program has the right intentions, my follow up question is, if asked, which of these purposes would your program participants say drives your program? If they answer "for the business to save money", then you're losing.

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"Will Run for Doughnuts"

"Will Run for Doughnuts"

This week is a good representation for several things that are wrong with many people’s attitude towards health and the culture being created around corporate wellness. Today (Wednesday June 4th) is National Running Day, and Friday (June 6th) is National Doughnut Day; mirroring the short-term activity based approach to wellness and the “chore for reward” type expectations which are being cemented in many corporate health strategies.  

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Beating Burnout: Applying the science

Beating Burnout: Applying the science

In part 2 of our posts about beating burnout, we look at how we apply the science of brain chemistry in the real world. Don't get stuck with default "wellness" initiatives. If you want to make a sustainable impact on employee engagement and productivity, you need a program that more effectively joins the dots between personal health, energy management, and performance.

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